mesquite flats sand dune at death valley

Camping at Death Valley ranges from luxurious resorts to remote and primitive. With a dozen developed campgrounds plus dispersed and backcountry camping options, everyone can find the right campsite for their Death Valley trip. Keep reading for everything you need to know about camping at Death Valley National Park in California.

Table of Contents

When is the best time to camp at Death Valley?

Death Valley is located in the California desert and conditions can be deadly. The best time to visit Death Valley is in spring and fall. Daytime temperatures can still be hot during these times but nights are refreshingly cool. To plan your whole trip, check out our complete guide to visiting Death Valley which includes a detailed trip itinerary.

Peak camping season is October 15 until April 15. Most of the lower elevation campgrounds are closed during hot summer months.

Alternatively, high elevation campgrounds such as Wild Rose, Thorndike and Mahogany Flat are open in non-peak times but closed during winter months. Snow and icy conditions are common in the higher elevation of the mountains surrounding the Death Valley during winter.

Reservations are accepted at Furnace Creek during peak camping season from October 15 to April 15. The park’s three private campgrounds, Fiddlers, Stovepipe Wells RV Resort and Panamint Springs Resort accept reservations year round.

devils golf course at death valley

What is the best campground at Death Valley?

The best campground at Death Valley depends on the season, your camping needs, and budget.

  • If you have unlimited budget and are planning far enough in advance to secure reservations, the resort amenities at the Fiddlers Campground and Stovepeipe Wells RV Resort will appeal to many.
  • Furnace Creek offers more affordable, centrally located sites for those planning far enough in advance to secure reservations.
  • The high elevation campgrounds will appeal to small RVs and tents.
  • Backcountry camping would be awesome for self contained campers in the winter.
  • For non-planners or big rigs, the ease and availability at Sunset Campground might be advantageous.

Death Valley Camping Rules and Regulations

The camping rules and regulations vary at Death Valley but a few are standardized regardless of location.

Campsite Restrictions

Death Valley campsites can accommodate up to 8 people, 4 pets, and 2 vehicles including no more than 1 recreational vehicle.

Group campsites are available at Furnace Creek campground for groups larger than 8 people and 2 vehicles.

Campfires

Fires are prohibited between June 15 and September 15 or when fire danger is high.

Vegetation within the national park is protected. No wood or plant collection is allowed. Firewood can be purchased at the general stores at Furnace Creek or Stovepipe Wells.

Fires are only allowed in NPS metal fire rings. Grills must be gas-powered. Propane fire pits are allowed.

Stay limits

Furnace Creek campground is limited to 14 days within a calendar year.

All other Death Valley camping is limited to 30 days within a calendar year.

Generator Hours

Generators are allowed in some Death Valley campgrounds. Check the Campgrounds of Death Valley section for generator hours at each site.

To learn more about camping with a generator, check out RV Generator Guide to the Basics: How to Choose the Best Option.

RV Length Restrictions

Death Valley campgrounds are not all RV-friendly. The park is huge so you don’t want to drive an hour or more to a campground to find your rig is too big to fit. Campground-specific length limits are explained in the Campgrounds of Death Valley section.

Check Out Time

Campground check-out time at Death Valley is 12 noon.

Wildlife safety measures

Coyotes and ravens are common at Death Valley. They are scavengers. Both will damage unattended trash and/or food containers left on campsites. For the safety and health of wildlife, keep your campsite clean and never leave trash or food unattended.

Pet food and water bowls should be stowed when not in use.

Small pets should not be left unattended. Coyotes have taken small animals from campsites.

Are Pets Allowed at Death Valley?

Pets are allowed in campgrounds but they are not allowed on park trails or boardwalks.

Pets

  • Pets must be kept on a leash 6 feet or shorter at all times.
  • Do not leave pets or their food/water bowls unattended as coyotes are common in the park.
  • Campsites are limited to four pets each.
  • Do not leave pets in cars in warm weather. Extremely hot conditions occur within minutes in a stopped car even in mild weather. Pets can suffer permanent damage or death from heat.
  • Owners are expected to clean up behind their pet.
  • Venemous snakes, spiders and scorpions live in the park. Monitor where your pets stick their noses to reduce their risk of a life threatening bite.

The National Park Service prohibits pets on trails, boardwalks and backcountry in Death Valley. However pets are allowed on park roads. The NPS recommending walking your pets on:

  • 20 Mule Team Canyon
  • Devil’s Golf Course Road
  • Father Crowley Point spur road to Padre Point
  • Furnace Creek Airport Road
  • Lake Hill Road
  • Mustard Canyon Road
  • Titus Canyon Road
  • Cottonwood-Marble Access Road

Additionally, Death Valley is surrounded by public land with less restrictive pet rules. Leashed pets are welcome on hiking trails on nearby Bureau of Land Management and National Forestry lands.

hiking at death valley

Campgrounds within Death Valley

Death Valley National Park covers over 3 million acres and some of the campgrounds are several hours from the Visitor Center in Furnace Creek. Most of the park doesn’t have cellular reception so plan ahead.

For your convenience, there are multiple RV dump stations and water fills in the Furnace Creek area, one at Stovepipe Wells and one at Mesquite Flats.

Three private campgrounds are also available in Death Valley with more amenities and higher prices.

How much does it cost to camp at Death Valley?

Camping fees vary. The cost to camp at Death Valley can range from free up to $80 per night for full hookups at Panamint Springs Resort.

The nine National Park campgrounds in Death Valley are less than $20 per night but do not offer RV hookups. Lifetime pass holders are eligible for camping discounts up to 50% off. Some of the smaller, less accessible campgrounds in Death Valley are even free.

Private Campgrounds in Death Valley

Death Valley is a massive park and the Park Service operates nine campgrounds. Additionally, they contract with private concessioners who run three additional campgrounds.

Private campgrounds located within Death Valley National Park are Stovepipe Wells RV ParkThe Ranch at Death Valley, and Panamint Springs Resort.

Is it safe to tent camp in Death Valley?

It is safe to camp in a tent within Death Valley. Many developed tent campgrounds are free in Death Valley. Additionally, backcountry and dispersed camping is allowed along much of the park’s 700 miles of dirt roads.

Keep in mind the area is home to scorpions, reptiles, coyotes, rodents and insects. A few common-sense safety precautions can be taken to keep these creatures out.

  • Secure food in vehicle or by hanging off the ground.
  • Close tents and RVs to limit access to wildlife.
  • Remote camping at Death Valley can be physically challenging but planning ahead can reduce any dangers. Provisions and water supply should be adequate for several days beyond your planned trip. Dry conditions require visitors to drink more water than usual so plan head.
desert views at death valley
desert views at death valley

Where can big rigs camp in Death Valley?

Mesquite Spring (no reservations), Stovepipe Wells, and Furnace Creek area campgrounds in Death Valley do not have RV length restrictions. However, the NPS advises that longer RVs may have trouble navigating the campground at Mesquite Spring, Texas Springs and Furnace Creek.

These campgrounds have narrow roads (entry and interior) and a few precariously positioned campsites which means only experienced and confident drivers should attempt these. Check site-specific length limits on recreation.gov before booking a campsite at Furnace Creek.

Sunset Campground, Mesquite Springs and Stovepipe Wells Campground are the only NPS campgrounds in Death Valley that do not have any RV length restrictions.

Death Valley Campground Summary Table

sumamry table of death valley campgrounds

Camping Death Valley Furnace Creek

Furnace Creek is the most centrally located area of the park. It is a great launching spot for Death Valley visitors who want to camp.

There are multiple campgrounds in Death Valley at Furnace Creek. The Furnace Creek Campground is a National Park campground with electric hookups. National Park campgrounds do not offer many amenities but lower prices reflect this difference.

Fiddlers Campground is privately run by The Oasis Resort. Sunset and Texas Springs NPS campgrounds offer RV access but don’t have hookups.

There is a free RV dump station across the street from the Furnace Creek visitor center. It is easily accessible from the highway. Sunset Campground also has a dump station within sight of the Furnace Creek Visitor Center.

For this and many other reasons you don’t want to miss the Furance Creek Visitor Center, read our Complete Guide to Visit Death Valley National Park including Itinerary

Fiddlers Campground

Fiddlers Campground is located at the Oasis Death Valley Resort formerly known as the Furnace Creek Resort. It is adjacent to the Death Valley Visitor Center at Furnace Creek.

Most sites do not have hookups but campers are allowed to run generators overnight. Their booking system lists full hookups sites but they are sold out for the next 12 months so I wouldn’t count on those.

Campers at Fiddlers Campground have access to the resort amenities including the pool and showers.

resort at furnace creek

Fiddlers Campground At A Glance

Sites: back-in only; gravel surface (max site length is 50 feet with additional parking for tow vehicles)

Amenities: FHU or no hookups (generators allowed overnight); community fire pits and picnic tables; access to resort pool, shower laundry, playground and sports courts; general store and restaurant on site

Price: approx. $30-$35

Reservations Accepted: online on Oasis Resort website (open year-round)

Furnace Creek Campground

The most popular camping ground in Death Valley is Furnace Creek. Furnace Creek is the only NPS campground in Death Valley that offers electrical hookups.

Only 18 sites at Furnace Creek have electrical and reservations are highly recommended during peak camping season. Peak camping season in Death Valley is October 15 until April 15.

It is very rare an electric site is vacant at Furnace Creek during peak camping season. Reservations can be made up to 2 days in advance and as far as 6 months before your visit. Furnace Creek campsites can be reserved by calling 1-877-444-6777 or visiting recreation.gov.

NPS warns big rigs that access to Furnace Creek campground is limited for large RVs. This means the roads and sites may be difficult for less experienced or confident drivers. Additionally, solo travelers might require assistance to safely navigate tight areas.

It is best practice to scout the best route in new campgrounds without your RV.

Furnace Creek Campground At A Glance

Sites: 136 sites (18 available with electrical hookups)

Amenities: water, picnic tables, flush toilets

Price: $11-$36

Reservations Accepted: Required at recreation.gov for non-summer (book early)

Sunset Campground

Sunset campground is located across the road from Furnace Creek Visitor Center. It is a large gravel lot that can accommodate hundreds of RVs. There are flush toilets and dishwashing stations.

Sunset Campground is your best bet of getting cellular data from your campsite in Death Valley. However, despite its central location cellular service is very weak to non-existent. We had no usable AT&T data during our two nights at Sunset. The visitor center and nearby resort both have wifi but neither reach the campers at Sunset.

Campsites at Sunset Campground in Death Valley are gravel pull-thru sites. Only extremely long rigs would have trouble fitting in the campsites at Sunset Campground.

We effortlessly drove into a campsite at Sunset Campground in our 38 foot Class A diesel pusher motorhome with a car in tow. Access is easy for any size rig.

The Furnace Creek Visitor Center is located across the street. It might be able to accommodate overflow parking if your tow vehicle doesn’t fit on the site.

Sunset Campground is open for first come first serve Death Valley camping. Non-summer seasonal campgrounds in Death Valley are typically open October 15 until April 15.

Sunset Campground At A Glance

Sites: 230 sites; large pull-thru gravel sites (max trailer length 50 feet; max RV length 50 feet); paved road; ADA campsites and amenities available

Amenities: no hookups (generators allowed between 7am and 9pm)

dump station & fresh water available seasonally

flush toilets, dish washing stations, 2 communal fire pits

Price: $14 ($7 with lifetime access passes)

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (closed in summer)

Texas Spring Campground

Texas Spring is located on a hillside above Sunset Campground overlooking Furnace Creek. The sites are more varied than Sunset’s gravel parking lot feel.

There are trees around the campground but few are large enough to provide shade during sunny hot days. Each site has its own picnic table and fire grate. Wood fires are allowed in fire grates.

We saw several small RVs at Texas Spring during our visit. Death Valley NPS restricts RVs larger than 35 feet from using Texas Spring Campground.

Larger RVs might find access a little challenging due to the angle of sites and proximity to neighbors. Always scout new sites before blindly driving a big rig in.

Texas Spring is open for first come first serve Death Valley camping during non-summer. Non-summer seasonal campgrounds in Death Valley are typically open October 15 until April 15.

No generators are allowed at Texas Spring Campground. However, during spring, generators are allowed in the upper loop at the Texas Springs Campgrounds.

26 of the 92 sites are designated as tents only.

Texas Spring Campground At A Glance

Sites: 92 scenic campsites located on a hillside with sporadic trees and vegetation (26 tent-only sites) (max trailer length 25 feet; max RV length 35 feet)

Amenities: no hookups (generators not allowed); picnic tables and fire grates at each site; flush toilets

Price: $16 ($8 with lifetime access passes)

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (closed in summer)

Stovepipe Wells Campground

Stovepipe Wells campground is on CA-190 at sea level.

It is located behind the privately run general store and across the road from the resort at Stovepipe Wells. Stovepipe Wells is approximately half an hour’s drive from Furnace Creek.

It is located close to Mesquite Flats Sand Dune with some dune views from the campground. The Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes are a popular attraction at Death Valley. For more ideas of things to do, check out 24 Amazing Things To Do at Death Valley: Including the Most Beautiful Can’t Miss Attractions.

sunset at mesquite sand dunes

The NPS campground at Stovepipe Wells has 190 first come, first serve sites available during non-summer. Non-summer seasonal campgrounds in Death Valley are typically open October 15 until April 15.

Stovepipe Wells campground has dishwashing stations and flush toilets but does not have showers. Shower and pool access can be purchased at the resort. Inquire at the general store.

The Stovepipe Wells campground does not have any RV length restrictions. Scouting new campsites is a best practice instead of driving a big rig into unknown areas.

Stovepipe Wells Campground At A Glance

Sites: 190 sites (28 tent-only sites)

Amenities: no hookups (generators allowed 7 am until 7 pm); picnic tables and fire grates at some sites; flush toilets; dishwashing stations, dump & fill water available seasonally

Price: $14 ($7 with lifetime access passes)

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (closed in summer)

Stovepipe Wells Village RV Park

Visitors to Death Valley wanting a more luxurious RV vacation should check out the privately run RV park and campground at Stovepipe Wells Village Resort.

The Death Valley Stovepipe Wells RV park and campground is small with only 14 sites. All sites offer full hookup including electric, water and sewer. Camping fees include the usage of the resort pool and lobby wifi.

Reservations for Death Valley Stovepipe Wells RV park and campground can be made online. Campsites sell out quickly. Sites vary from small (RVs less than 27 feet) to large (RVs up to 40 feet).

Stovepipe Wells Village Campground At A Glance

Sites: 14 sites with varying sizes (max length 40 feet)

Amenities: full hookups with pool and shower access; general store and restaurant on site

Price: $40

Reservations Accepted: online

Mesquite Spring Campground

Mesquite Spring Campground is located at 1,400 feet elevation near Scotty’s Castle and Grapevine Canyon. It is a good home base for northern Death Valley sites such as Ubehebe Crater. For more northern Death Valley sites you won’t want to miss, check out 24 Amazing Things To Do at Death Valley.

Mesquite Spring is open for camping in Death Valley year-round. It offers flush toilets, RV dump station and potable water even during summer months.

The drive from Furnace Creek is 1 hour and 15 minutes. If visiting Death Valley for the first time, I would recommend staying at a southern campground in addition to Mesquite Spring to reduce driving times to main attractions.

Access from Nevada on Hwy 267 is closed until further notice due to weather-related damage.

Mesquite Spring Campground At A Glance

Sites: 40 sites surrounded by desert mountains

Amenities: no hookups (generators allowed 7 am until 7 pm); picnic tables and fire grates at each site; flush toilets; year-round RV dump station and potable water fill

Price: $14 ($7 with lifetime access passes)

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (open year-round)

Emigrant Campground

Emigrant Campground at Death Valley is tent only. It is located 40 minutes from Furnace Creek. At 2,100 feet elevation, it offers cooler conditions than lower elevation campgrounds.

Emigrant Campground only has 10 sites available but is only year round. There is no fee to camp at Emigrant campground in Death Valley.

Emigrant Campground At A Glance

Sites: 10 tent only sites

Amenities: picnic tables and fire grates at each site; flush toilets

Price: $0 FREE

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (open year round)

Panamint Springs RV Resort Campground

Panamint Springs RV Resort Campground at Death Valley offers tent rentals with cots, campsites for tents and RVs. Some RV sites offer full hookups. The campground power is provided by a diesel generator and full hookup electric sites are priced high.

It is located at the western entrance to Death Valley. The drive to Furnace Creek Visitor Center is one hour. I would only recommend staying at Panamint Springs either leaving or entering Death Valley if needed. It is not conveniently located to any of the park’s main attractions and prices are not competitive with other Death Valley camping options.

When booking Panamint Springs be sure to clarify fees and surcharges before providing payment information. Extra people and pets are both subject to surcharges so the posted price may not cover your entire family.

Panamint Springs RV Resort Campground At A Glance

Sites: 26 dry camping sites ; 22 tent sites; 8 full hookup sites; limited tent cabin sites with cots

Amenities: fire grates at each site; picnic tables at some sites; showers; flush toilets

Price: $55 for 2 person tent cabins with cots

$75 for 4 person tent cabins with cots

$15 tent sites

$30 RV dry camping sites

$80 full hookup sites (includes $40 electricity surcharge)

Surcharge for pets

Reservations Accepted: reservations 775-482-7680 or via email [email protected]

High Elevation Camping near Death Valley CA

The best way to escape the heat of the valley floor in late spring and early fall is to camp at one of the park’s high elevation campgrounds. Wildrose, Thorndike and Mahogany Flats are the high elevation campgrounds within Death Valley National Park.

The steep and curvy mountain roads in the high elevation park area are not accessible by longer vehicles. Wildrose, Thorndike and Mahogany Flats Campgrounds are all limited to vehicles with a total length of less than 25 feet.

Wild Rose Campground

Wild Rose Campground is located at 4,100 feet elevation and is not accessible by vehicles over 25 feet in total length.

The campground is located near the Charcoal kilns on Wildrose Canyon Road. To read more about the mining history at Death Valley check out Complete Guide to Visit Death Valley National Park.

charcoal kilns at death valley

Temperatures were much cooler than the valley floor and we were very jealous of campers at Wild Rose.

Wild Rose Campground At A Glance

Sites: 23 sites in the mountains

Amenities: no hookups; picnic tables and fire grates at each site; vault toilets (seasonal)

Price: $0 Free

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (open year round)

Thorndike Campground

Thorndike campground at Death Valley is a primitive camping site located in the mountains. It sits at 7,400 feet above sea level.

RVs and trailers are not allowed at Thorndike.

Due to the mountain weather, the Thorndike campground in Death Valley closes for winter.

High clearance vehicles are recommended. Access may require 4×4 vehicle. Check with NPS for current conditions.

Thorndike Campground At A Glance

Sites: 6 sites in the mountains (RVs and trailers are not allowed)

Amenities: no hookups; picnic tables and fire grates at each site; vault toilets (seasonal)

Price: $0 Free

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (closed for winter)

thorndike campground sign at detah valley

Mahogany Flat Campground

Mahogany Flat campground is located in a pine and juniper forest with sweeping views over Death Valley. It sits at 8,200 above sea level.

Telescope Peak trailhead is nearby. For a complete guide to hiking at Death Valley check here.

Due to the mountain weather, the Mahogany Flat campground in Death Valley closes for winter.

Small RVs and trailers are allowed at Mahogany Flat campground however winding roads and low tree branches may be present. High clearance vehicles are recommended. Access may require 4×4 vehicle. Check with NPS for current conditions.

Mahogany Flat Campground At A Glance

Sites: 10 sites in the mountains (max trailer length 12 feet; max RV length 25 feet)

Amenities: no hookups; picnic tables and fire grates at each site; vault toilets

Price: $0 Free

Reservations Accepted: first come first serve (closed for winter)

view at mahogany flats campground in death valley

Other Dry Camping Options: Backcountry and Dispersed Camping at Death Valley

If you are feeling more adventurous and don’t need the amenities of a campground, Death Valley National Park allows both backcountry camping and dispersed camping.

Can you dry camp in Death Valley?

Dry camping is camping without hookups. Most established campgrounds in Death Valley do not offer hookups but many charge a camping fee. Dispersed and backcountry camping is another dry camping option in Death Valley. Dispersed and backcountry camping is free for visitors after the park entrance fee is paid.

Can you camp anywhere in Death Valley?

Camping is not allowed everywhere in Death Valley but much of the park is open to campers. Generally, camping is allowed within one mile of any developed area or park road that isn’t designated as a day-use area. Common sense should be used to respect the land and natural resources.

backcountry camping near death valley

Backcountry and Dispersed Camping Rules at Death Valley

  • Camp more than 100 yards from water sources.
  • Car and dispersed camping is allowed at least one mile from paved roads, day use areas and mining structures.
  • Park entrance fee is required to access national park land. America the Beautiful passes are valid.
  • Camping is limited to 30 days per year.
  • Hike on established trails when possible. If trails do not exist, chose the path that will cause the least damage to vegetation, soil crusts, animal burrows and aquatic habitats.
  • Groups should not exceed 12 people.
  • Pack it in, pack it out. Leave no trace.
  • Mine shafts, tunnels and buildings should be considered unstable. Do not enter these structures.
  • Backpackers can park their cars along the shoulder of park roads. Unattended cars on Highway 190 in Death Valley will be impounded after 10 days.
  • Water sources are unreliable and often unsafe. Backcountry hikers should pack all of their water.

Are backcountry camping permits required in Death Valley?

Backcountry camping permits are not required in Death Valley but are encouraged for safety. NPS uses permits to track park visitation and usage by park area. Additionally, permit information can be used in the event a search and rescue is needed.

Voluntary overnight backcountry camping permits can be submitted during business hours at Furnace Creek Visitor Center or Stovepipe Wells Ranger Station.

Dispersed Camping at Death Valley

Dispersed camping is allowed at Death Valley but the area’s terrain and weather can be unforgiving. Most park visitors would rather pay for the safety and convenience of a developed campground.

If you prefer the affordability and solitude of dispersed camping, plan your route, safety and provisions for the possibility of a remote accident. Be sure to carry enough water for your entire party.

A flat tire in the middle of nowhere could be disastrous if you don’t have the proper tools and supplies to repair or change it. Running out of fuel miles from civilization could result in injury or death trying to find help.

Dispersed camping is generally permitted within one mile of any developed park area or road in Death Valley. Dispersed camping is not allowed on day-use specific roads.

Campers should use previously disturbed areas to make camp and avoid further damage to vegetation or terrain.

Current Death Valley areas closed to camping are:

  • On the valley floor, from Ashford Mill in the south to the north end of the shifting sands of the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes
  • The Eureka and Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes
  • Within one mile of Greenwater Canyon
  • Darwin Falls Trail
  • ”Day Use Only” dirt roads including
    • Titus Canyon Rd
    • Mosaic Canyon Rd
    • Natural Bridge Rd
    • Mustard Canyon
    • Grotto Canyon
    • Piñon Mesa
    • West Side Rd
    • Wildrose Rd
    • Skidoo Rd
    • Aguereberry Point Rd
    • Keane Wonder Mine Rd
    • Cottonwood Canyon Rd (first 8 miles only)
    • Racetrack Rd (from Teakettle Jct to Homestake Dry Camp)
    • Desolation Canyon Rd
    • Historic Stovepipe Well Rd
    • Salt Creek Rd

Dispersed Camping sites at Death Valley

The Pads (GPS 36.3391, -116.5996)and Echo Canyon Road (GPS 36.4461, -116.8011) both have good Campendium reviews for Death Valley dispersed camping. Neither of these dispersed camping sites has a cellular signal. However, the remote dark skies of Death Valley will provide excellent stargazing opportunities.

Car Camping at Death Valley

  • Car campers should park adjacent to the road in previously disturbed areas. Vegetation should not be further damaged when chosing a camping spot.
  • Check current road conditions before driving on any of the park’s unpaved roads. Follow guidance for 4×4 vehicles and low clearance restrictions.
  • Prepare to change a flat tire and make minor repairs.
  • Do not expect cellular service. Most of the park is wilderness and does not have any cellular reception.
  • Specific park areas restrict camping so check current conditions before heading into the backcountry of Death Valley.

Summary of Camping at Death Valley

Death Valley National Park is a magical place unlike any other. Due to the sheer size of Death Valley and long driving times, visitors generally stay at least one night in the park. Camping is the most economical lodging option at Death Valley.

Death Valley offers 12 campgrounds including 3 private managed sites within the park boundaries. Amenities range from none to pool access at resorts.

Some Death Valley campgrounds are open year round and others close seasonally. Additionally, backcountry and dispersed camping is allowed in much of the park’s boundaries.

Be sure to plan ahead for the best camping experience at Death Valley.

kara on the badlands loops

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